Daily News update on – Science


July 30, 2022
NEWS

Spaceflight Now

Officials with the companies flying the first two CLPS missions, Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines, said recently their commercial landers are scheduled to launch late this year or early next year. The CLPS program is intended to …

Facebook Twitter

The New York Times

The rocket Mr. Nelson referred to in his statement launched last Sunday, carrying to orbit a laboratory module that was added to China’s space station, Tiangong. Usually, the large booster stages of rockets immediately drop back to Earth after they are …

Facebook Twitter

Space.com

Jupiter always shines, even when seen sideways in unprocessed data. Astronomers are busy poring through new data from the James Webb Space Telescope (nicknamed Webb or JWST) in a continuing rush to spot ever-more-distant galaxies.

Facebook Twitter

CNN

The Chinese 23-ton Long March 5B rocket, which delivered a new module to its space station, took off from Hainan Island at 2:22 p.m. local time Sunday, July 24, and the module successfully docked with China’s orbital outpost.

Facebook Twitter

NPR

The moon has pits and caves where temperatures stay at roughly 63 degrees Fahrenheit, making human habitation a possibility, according to new research from planetary scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles. Although much …

Facebook Twitter

Space.com

Turn your attention to the southeastern sky during the early hours on Sunday (July 31) to see Mars approach Uranus. The duo will be close enough to share the same field of view as seen with binoculars or a low-magnification telescope, as illustrated by …

Facebook Twitter

Space.com

A big Chinese rocket body will likely crash back to Earth tomorrow (July 30), but nobody knows exactly when or where. The 25-ton (22.5 metric tons) core stage of a Long March 5B rocket will reenter Earth’s atmosphere tomorrow at 2:05 p.m. EDT (1805 …

Facebook Twitter

Mashable

A 3-D rendering of an asteroid belt. A bright object in the background. The two asteroids will make a leisurely pass over Earth. Credit: NASA/ SOFIA / Lynette Cook …

Facebook Twitter

Space.com

Call it the scent of space. There’s a persistent “peculiar odor” on board the International Space Station (ISS) that takes a few days to get used to, according to European astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. “When I got here a couple of months ago for my …

Facebook Twitter

pnas.org

This damage is not typically caused by freezing water expanding but by the process of cryosuction—which continues after ice’s initial growth. Here, we characterize how stresses build up in this process with unprecedented microscale resolution.

Facebook Twitter