Daily News update on – Science


July 15, 2021

NEWS

Space.com

What does it take to do a spacewalk? Skill, courage, and being able to wear a men’s size medium.

On June 25, astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet successfully completed an almost seven-hour EVA (extravehicular activity, or spacewalk) to install solar panels on the International Space Station. What does it take to don a spacesuit and venture …

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Space.com

Hubble trouble is latest glitch in space telescope’s long and storied history

For the past month, our most beloved eye on the universe has been closed, blinded by a computer glitch that NASA experts are still working to solve. After 31 years in space, the Hubble Space Telescope unexpectedly shut down on June 13 after suffering a …

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Space.com

Cruise by Jupiter and its giant moon Ganymede in this gorgeous Juno flyby video

On June 7, Juno zoomed within just 645 miles (1,038 kilometers) of Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system. It was the closest a probe had gotten to the icy, heavily cratered world since May 2000, when NASA’s Galileo spacecraft flew by at a distance of …

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Space.com

City-sized asteroids smacked ancient Earth 10 times more often than thought

Asteroids the size of cities, like the one that wiped out the dinosaurs, slammed into the ancient Earth way more often than previously thought, a new study has found. Approximately every 15 million years, our evolving planet would get a hit by a piece of rock …

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Science Magazine

A human apolipoprotein L with detergent-like activity kills intracellular pathogens

Most human cells, not just those belonging to the immune system, mount protective responses to infection when activated by the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). How IFN-γ confers this function in nonimmune cells and tissues is poorly understood.

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Phys.Org

Optical levitation of glass nanosphere enables quantum control

Researchers at ETH Zurich have trapped a tiny sphere measuring a hundred nanometres using laser light and slowed down its motion to the lowest quantum mechanical state. This technique could help researchers to study quantum effects in macroscopic …

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The Washington Post

Moon ‘wobble’ and climate change could mean ‘double whammy’ of flooding in 2030s, NASA warns

In the coming decades, higher tides coupled with sea-level rise will cause U.S. coastlines to experience a “dramatic” uptick in flooding, a new NASA study finds. By the mid-2030s, scientists project that there could be a “rapid” increase in the frequency of …

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Phys.Org

Thinking without a brain: Studies in brainless slime molds reveal that they use physical cues to decide where to grow

If you didn’t have a brain, could you still figure out where you were and navigate your surroundings? Thanks to new research on slime molds, the answer may be “yes.” Scientists from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and the Allen Discovery Center at …

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CNN

An 18-year-old is going to space with Jeff Bezos

New York (CNN Business) The mystery bidder who put up a whopping $28 million for an 11-minute joy ride to the edge of space alongside Jeff Bezos will not make the trip, Bezos’ rocket company Blue Origin announced Thursday. Blue Origin said in a press …

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CBS News

Lockheed Martin ramps up assembly of Orion capsules that will carry astronauts back to the moon

The new Spacecraft Test, Assembly and Resource (STAR) Center, dedicated Thursday, will be used to assemble Orion components that up to now primarily have been built in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the nearby Kennedy Space …

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